Home... Index... Articles... Links... From the Press... Snippets... Message Board... Editor's Bio... Bulletin Board... Submissions... Free Update... E-mail

usadeepsouth.com

Colored Jeans on the Clothesline
~~Such Precious Days Donít Last~~

by Barbara J. Robinson


She was up early every morning, cleaning house and taking care of the family duties with the spirit, vitality, and energy of youth, far too busy to treasure the day. She took pride in the fact that she kept a spotless house and had supper on the table when her husband returned from work.

Her son was in the first grade, and she took pride in the fact that she hung her sonís little jeans out in the sunshine and fresh air. They hung neatly, all in a row, jeans of every color: brown, black, green, navy, maroon, and blue. She took pride in the fact her son had a pair of jeans in each color for school.

Where did those days go? Before she knew it, her son was grown and gone with kids of his own. Those precious family days were a treasure that didnít last. All too soon, spring turns to summer, and kids grow up too fast, leave home and are gone. Summer turns to fall. Fall turns to winter. What you wouldnít give to hang those precious little jeans of every color on the clothesline and watch them blow in the wind! Such precious days just donít last.

Those were the days, the best days in life. Such precious days fly by with the speed of lightning. Suddenly, she wonders where did the time go? How did she get to be this old? She no longer cleans her house with the spirit, energy, and vitality of her youth. What she once took pride in is dull, boring, and humdrum -- just another ordinary, routine day. Now, there are no little jeans blowing in the wind. No first grader will come home to tell her excitedly about his school day. Those are all things of the past, things she didnít treasure when she had them, because she was always in such a hurry.

Now her little grandsonís mother throws his bluejeans in the dryer as she rushes to get ready for work each morning. The hands of time slip by like a silent thief.

Off to work. Off to school. School years fly. No little colored jeans blow in the wind. Days of the past, treasured days, just donít last.


____________________________________________


Bio: You can read more about Barbara Robinsonís life in her Southern memoir set in Louisiana and Mississippi, Magnolia: A Wilting Flower, available at your favorite online bookstores including Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble. Her website is accessed by clicking here. Barbara is a member of the Florida Writers Association. ( FloridaWriters.net ) She teaches language arts to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders in the Sunshine state.


Want to leave a comment on Barbaraís story?
Please write Ye Editor at bethjacks@hotmail.com.

Thanks!


Back to USADEEPSOUTH - I index page

Back to USADEEPSOUTH - II index page